Skip to Main Content
Mobile Menu

Concurrent Enrollment Course Descriptions

collage of workshop activities

The following university courses are offered by the Boise State Concurrent Enrollment program.

Course descriptions provide students with course objective, credit value, and prerequisite information for Boise State Concurrent Enrollment courses.

Scroll down or click on the course subject below to find the description.


Accounting

CourseDescription
ACCT 205
Introduction to Financial Accounting
(3 credits) Introduction to financial reporting. The primary objective is to make the student aware of the importance of accounting information as a powerful tool in the business decision-making process. Emphasis of the course is on the uses of financial information in making investment and credit decisions rather than the preparation of the information. PRE/COREQ: ITM 105 or satisfactory completion of computer competency exam covering basic spreadsheet skills or an alternate instructor-approved course.

American Sign Language

CourseDescription
ASL 101
American Sign Language I
(4 credits) Develops beginning abilities in receptive and expressive skills. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. Emphasis placed on the history of sign language and deaf culture. Course conducted primarily in ASL.
ASL 102
American Sign Language II
(4 credits) Continues developing abilities in receptive and expressive skills. Further study of grammatical structures, vocabulary and culture. Course conducted primarily in ASL. PREREQ: ASL 101 or PERM/INST.
ASL 201
American Sign Language III
(4 credits) Continues developing intermediate abilities in receptive and expressive skills. Further study of grammatical structures, vocabulary and culture. Course conducted in ASL. PREREQ: ASL 102 or PERM/INST.
ASL 202
American Sign Language IV
(4 credits) Continues developing intermediate abilities in receptive and expressive skills. Further study of grammatical structures, vocabulary and culture. Course conducted in ASL. PREREQ: ASL 201 or PERM/INST.

Anthropology

CourseDescription
ANTH 101
Biological Anthropology
(3 credits) Introduction to human evolution through the study of variation, genetics, adaptation, living primates, the fossil record, and the relationship between biology and behavior.
ANTH 102
Cultural Anthropology
(3 credits) Introduction to the descriptions, analysis, and explanations of the different ways of life, or cultures, through which human groups have adapted to their environments. Explanation of the nature and characteristic of culture as an adaptive to their environments. Explanation of the nature and characteristic of culture as an adaptive mechanism for human survival.
ANTH 103
Introduction to Archaeology
(3 credits) Introduction to the historic background and basic techniques of anthropological archaeology. Methods and theory used to reconstruct prehistoric cultures, their environmental settings, activities, and histories.

Arabic

CourseDescription
ARABIC 101
Elementary Arabic I
(4 credits) Develops beginning abilities in Modern Standard Arabic in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context.
ARABIC 102
Elementary Arabic II
(4 credits) Continues to develop abilities in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. PREREQ: ARABIC 101.

Art

CourseDescription
ART 100
Introduction to Art
(3 credits) An introduction to the basic language of visual art.

Biology

CourseDescription
BIOL 100
Concepts of Biology
(4 credits) An introduction to fundamental biological principles of cell and molecular biology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Introduction to organismal diversity, physiology, and morphology.
BIOL 107
Introduction to Human Biology
(4 credits) An introduction to human structure and function and the interrelationships of various human systems. Homeostasis, disease, health and their relationships to human anatomy and physiology. This is a non-major course that does not satisfy biology or allied health program requirements.
BIOL 191
Biology 1: Intro to Cell and Molecular Biology
(4 credits) Designed for biology and health science majors. The basic characteristics of living systems including the chemical and physical structure of cells, genetics, development, evolution, and ecology. Recommended: Solid preparation in high school biology and chemistry.

Business

CourseDescription
BUS 101
Business for the New Generation
(3 credits) Acquaints students with business organizations, functional areas, and current business issues such as ethics, social responsibility and sustainability. Presents the strengths and limitations of the business enterprise, while promoting innovation, creativity, and technology use in a global context. Emphasis on strategy, communication, problem solving, teams and negotiation. Format will be lecture plus interactive breakout groups, simulations and integrated cases.

Chemistry

CourseDescription
CHEM 100
Concepts of Chemistry
(4 credits) Acquaint students with chemistry and its relationship to other fields of study and modern life. Students who have received credit for CHEM 102 or CHEM 112 may not receive credit for CHEM 100.
CHEM 101
Essentials of Chemistry I
(4 credits) First semester of a sequence course designed primarily for health science majors or students who need an introductory chemistry course prior to taking CHEM 111. Basic concepts of inorganic and physical chemistry are covered. PREREQ: MATH 108 or satisfactory placement score.
CHEM 111
General Chemistry 1
(4 credits) The first semester of a one-year sequence course. A thorough study of the fundamentals of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, chemical reactions in solutions, gases, thermochemistry, basic quantum theory, chemical periodicity, and elementary chemical bonding. CHEM 111 assumes that students without one year of high school chemistry have completed a semester preparative course (see CHEM 99). PREREQ: MATH 143 or successful completion of the CHEM 111 Math exam.

Chinese

CourseDescription
CHINESE 101
Elementary Mandarin Chinese I
(4 credits) Develops beginning abilities in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. Introduces Simplified Chinese Characters and aspects of Chinese culture.
CHINESE 102
Elementary Mandarin Chinese II
(4 credits) Continues to develop beginning abilities in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. Introduces simplified Chinese characters and aspects of Chinese culture. PREREQ: CHINESE 101 or PERM/INST.

Computer Science

CourseDescription
CS 101
Introduction To Computer Science Principles
(3 credits) Introduction to the central ideas, practices, and impact of computer science and computational thinking. Covers the seven big ideas in computer science: creativity, abstraction, data and information, algorithms, programming, the internet, and global impact. Computational thinking practices: connecting computing, creating computational artifacts, abstracting, analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating. PREREQ: MATH 108 or satisfactory placement score.
CS 121
Computer Science I
(4 credits) Introduction to object-oriented problem solving and programming. Software development process. Data and expression, conditionals and loops, arrays and lists, and classes and interfaces. Introduction to graphical user interfaces (GUIs). Guided, in-class programming activities and targeted projects to teach problem solving and software development skills. PREREQ: MATH 170.

Creative Writing

CourseDescription
CW 203
Writing Fiction
(3 credits) Introduction to writing fiction. Close reading of fiction texts, fiction writing exercises, and discussion of student’s original fiction in a workshop setting. PREREQ: ENGL 102 or equivalent.

Economics

CourseDescription
ECON 201
Principles of Macroeconomics
(3 credits) Economic principles are used to analyze the aggregate performance of developed economies. Analysis is applied to domestic and international macroeconomics issues. The goals and problems of high employment, price stability, growth, and the balance of payments are analyzed. Monetary, fiscal and other national policies are discussed.
ECON 202
Principles of Microeconomics
(3 credits) An introduction to microeconomic analysis covering supply and demand, basic market structures, the operation of price systems, and the distribution of income. Provides an introduction to some applied areas of economics such as international, regional, the public sector, and economic development.

Educational Technology

CourseDescription
ED-CIFS 201
Foundations of Education
(3 credits) Social, multicultural, philosophical, and historical perspectives in education; current educational issues; and problems of education. Provides a conceptual framework from which students will learn to reflect upon and question American public education.
ED-ESP 223
Child Growth and Development
(3 credits) Growth and development from birth through eighth grade, addressing physical, cognitive, communication, adaptive, social, and emotional domains. Emphasis on the role of the families as well as individual differences in the study of human development. Includes applied assignments and experiences.

Engineering Science

CourseDescription
ENGR 100
Energy for Society
(3 credits) A basic understanding of energy and how it has been put to use is developed to promote a better understanding of our present technological society with its energy, environmental, social, and political problems. Alternative as well as conventional energy solutions are considered. This is a general education course, having no prerequisite.
ENGR 115
Idaho Aerospace Scholar
(2 credits) The Idaho Science Aerospace Scholars is a course offered through the Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA), online for high school students. Students will explore and interact with the history and internal functions of NASA space exploration through online NASA research, virtual simulations, team design projects, and problem-solving activities. Students will explore STEM careers and interact with Idaho scientists, engineers, and other STEM professions.
ENGR 120
Introduction to Engineering
(3 credits) Students use critical thinking and gain design-oriented engineering experience by working through projects that expose them to engineering disciplines. Professional skill development includes teamwork, oral and written communication, and professional development/ethical responsibility. PREREQ: MATH 147 or MATH 143 and MATH 144, or satisfactory placement score.

English

CourseDescription
ENGL 101
Introduction to College Writing
(3 credits) Introduction to critical reading and to writing processes, including invention, revision, and editing. Emphasis on writing thoughtful explorations of readings, observations, ideas, and experiences; developing the author's voice and inventiveness; editing for style and conventions of standard usage.
ENGL 102
Introduction to College Writing and Research
(3 credits) An inquiry-based course that continues work with critical reading and writing processes and provides experiences with methods and genres of researched writing. Students will initiate research projects, gather information from a range of sources, and demonstrate they can write about that information purposefully, using appropriate documentation. PREREQ: ENGL 101 or satisfactory placement score.
ENGL 110
Literature and Ideas
(3 credits) An exploration of ideas in literature and other cultural texts. Topics will vary, and texts may include film, drama, new and interactive media, poetry, fiction, graphic novels, and other literary and cultural forms.

Environmental Studies

CourseDescription
ENVSTD 121
Introduction to Environmental Studies
(3 credits) Introduction to the interdisciplinary nature of environmental concepts and issues. Integrates scientific, socio-political, and humanistic approaches to the understanding of nature and of how humans interact with the rest of nature.

Finance

CourseDescription
FINAN 208
Personal Finance
(3 credits) This course addresses the growing complexity of financial decision-making faced by the individual: how to avoid financial entanglements; installment buying; borrowing money; owning or renting a home; budgeting and money management; savings and investment alternatives; life, health, accident and auto insurance; and personal income taxes and estate planning.

French

CourseDescription
FRENCH 101
Elementary French I
(4 credits) Develops beginning abilities in all four languages skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. Introduces students to Francophone cultures. Students who successfully complete this course may not receive credit for FRENCH 111 or 112.
FRENCH 102
Elementary French II
(4 credits) Continues to develop beginning abilities in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. Introduces students to Francophone cultures. PREREQ: FRENCH 101 or equivalent as determined by placement exam.
FRENCH 201
Intermediate French I
(4 credits) Further development of all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Intensive review of fundamentals of structure and vocabulary in a communicative context. Topics for conversation focus on Francophone cultures. Course conducted in French. PREREQ: FRENCH 102 or equivalent as determined by placement exam or PERM/INST.

Geoscience

CourseDescription
GEOS 100
Fundamentals of Geology
(4 credits) An introduction to the principles of physical and historical geology. Topics include weathering, erosion, glaciation, volcanism, earthquakes, rocks, minerals, maps, and the origin of the earth and its physical and biological development. Open to all students except those with previous credit in geology, or earth science majors and those nonscience majors who plan an eight-hour sequence in geology. Field trips required. Lab fee required. PREREQ: MATH 108 or MATH 123.

German

CourseDescription
GERMAN 101
Elementary German I
(4 credits) Develops beginning abilities in all four language skills; speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in communicative context. Introduces students to Germanic cultures.
GERMAN 102
Elementary German II
(4 credits) Continues to develop beginning abilities in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. Introduces students to Germanic cultures. PREREQ: GERMAN 101 or instructor's permission.

Health

CourseDescription
HLTH 101
Medical Terminology
(3 credits) Introduction to Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, combining forms and roots used in medical terminology, as well as the study of anatomical, physiological, and pathological terms, clinical procedures, abbreviations, and lab tests according to systems of the body. Medical terminology is treated as a medical language and clinical application is stressed.

History

CourseDescription
HIST 101
History of Western Civilization: Prehistory to the 17th Century
(3 credits) Introduces methods of historical interpretation and presents a political, economic, and cultural survey of western civilization from the earliest settled communities of the ancient Near East in the fourth millennium B.C. up through the cultural renaissance and religious reformation of western Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries of the Christian era.
HIST 111
United States History
(3 credits) Surveys American society from pre-Columbian times through the Civil War era, with emphasis on the formative issues and conflicts that shape national politics and culture.
HIST 112
United States History
(3 credits) Surveys American society from pre-Columbian times through the Civil War era, with emphasis on the formative issues and conflicts that shape national politics and culture.

Information Technology Management

CourseDescription
ITM 104
Operating Systems and Word Processing Topics
(1 credit) Introduces computer and technology concepts and develops skills using current home/office and Internet productivity software. Basic functions of the operating system, basic to intermediate word-processing skills, introduction to hardware, software, Internet and networking concepts for use in the workplace, educational settings, and the home.
ITM 106
Database Topics
(1 credit) Basic to intermediate database skills development, hardware, software, Internet, and networking concept materials for use in the workplace, educational settings, and the home. (Pass/Fail.)
ITM 109
Introductory Spreadsheet Topics
(1 credit) Introduction to spreadsheet skills using Excel. (Pass/Fail.) ITM 109 cannot be taken for credit after ITM 105.

Japanese

CourseDescription
JAPANESE 101
Elementary Japanese I
(4 credits) Develops beginning abilities in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. The course also introduces Katakana, Hiragana, and a limited number of Chinese characters. Course conducted in Japanese.

Kinesiology

CourseDescription
KINES 121
Taping and Wrapping Techniques in Athletic Training
(1 credit) Instructs students in a variety of wrapping and taping procedures used in the field of athletic training as forms of external support. A prerequisite for admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. Special fee required.
KINES 140
Personal Health
(3 credits) Covers nutrition, diseases, health needs, services, drugs, family living, and personality structure and development. Enhances student adjustment toward effective functioning in a changing environment.
KINES 220
Introduction to Athletic Injuries
(Sports Medicine)
(3 credits) A survey course introducing the principles of care and prevention of sport induced injury. Emphasis will be on identification and differentiation of minor and major trauma related to sports participation. A prerequisite for admission to the Athletic Training Education Program. PREREQ: BIOL 107 or BIOL 227 or PERM/INST.

Latin

CourseDescription
LATIN 211
Elementary Classical Latin
(4 credits) An intensive introduction to the basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of classical Latin with emphasis on comprehension of the nominal declension and verbal conjugation forms of the language. Survey of Roman republican literature with illustrative reading passages excerpted from the ancient authors.
LATIN 212
Advanced Classical Latin
(4 credits) Second semester of the intensive introduction to the study of classical Latin with emphasis on comprehension of the advanced grammatical forms and syntactical patterns of the language. Survey of Roman imperial literature with translations and analysis of extended historical and literary texts from the ancient authors. PREREQ: LATIN 211 or instructor's permission.

Mathematics

CourseDescription
MATH 160
Survey of Calculus
(4 credits) A survey of the essentials of calculus, intended mainly for students in business and social sciences; emphasis on applications to such areas. Basic concepts and computational techniques for functions, derivatives, and integrals, with emphasis on polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Very brief introduction to calculus of functions of several variables. MATH 160 cannot be taken for credit after MATH 170 or MATH 171. PREREQ: MATH 143 or MATH 149 or satisfactory placement score.
MATH 171
Calculus I: Theory and Applications
(4 credits) Limits and continuity. Derivatives and antiderivatives, including trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The relationship between a function, its derivative, and its antiderivative. Integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Applications of calculus to physical models, geometry, approximation, and optimization. Includes elements of the theory of calculus and the language of mathematics. Credit cannot be earned for both MATH 170 and MATH 171. PREREQ: MATH 143 and MATH 144, or satisfactory placement score.
MATH 176
Calculus II: Theory and Applications
(4 credits) A continuation of MATH 171. Techniques of integration and calculation of antiderivatives. Applications of integration to physical models, including volume, moment, mass, and centroid. Convergence of sequences and series of real numbers. Taylor series, Taylor polynomials, and applications to approximation. Vectors, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. Includes elements of the theory of calculus and the language of mathematics. Credit cannot be earned for both MATH 175 and MATH 176. PREREQ: MATH 143, MATH 144, and MATH 171, or corresponding satisfactory placement score.
MATH 187
Discrete and Foundational Mathematics
(3 credits) Content drawn from propositional and predicate logic; proof logic, induction and recursion, elementary set theory; functions and relations; combinatorial enumeration; graph theory and basic elementary number theory. Intended for computer science majors. Credit cannot be granted for both MATH 187 and MATH 189. PREREQ: MATH 170.
MATH 254
Introduction to Statistics
(3 credits) Pre-calculus treatment of descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression, correlation, introduction to probability. Emphasis on reasoning, problem solving, communicating ideas, and applications to a wide variety of disciplines. Use of computer statistics packages and calculators to handle computations. Carries no credit after MATH 360 or MATH 361. PREREQ: MATH 108 or satisfactory placement score.
MATH 275
Multivariable And Vector Calculus
(3 credits) Vector algebra and geometry, functions of several variables, partial and directional derivatives, gradient, chain rule, optimization, multiple and iterated integrals. Parametric curves and surfaces, vector fields, divergence and curl, line and surface integrals, Green’s, Stokes’ and divergence theorems. Use of software such as Maple or Mathematica for visualization, exploration and solutions of “real-world” problems. PREREQ: MATH 175 or MATH 176.

Physics

CourseDescription
PHYS 101
Introduction to Physics
(4 credits) A broad survey of basic physics concepts and principles including motion, energy, electricity, magnetism, light, relativity, atoms, fission, and fusion. Some examples will be related to social applications. A one semester core course that uses some basic algebra.
PHYS 104
Life In The Universe
(4 credits) Emphasis is on our solar system, the origin of chemical abundances, and astronomical requirements for the development of life; extra-solar planetary systems, and the search for life in the universe.

Political Science

CourseDescription
POLS 101
American National Government
(3 credits) Institutions and processes of the American political system, emphasizing social, ideological, and constitutional background.

Psychology

CourseDescription
PSYC 101
Survey of Psychological Science
(3 credits) Investigation of mental processes and behavior through the lens of the scientific method. This survey course draws from topics within the American Psychological Association’s five pillars of psychology: Pillar 1 Biological (Neuroscience, Sensation, Consciousness, Motivation); Pillar 2 Cognitive (Cognition, Memory, Perception); Pillar 3 Development (Learning, Life Span Development, Language); Pillar 4 Social and Personality (Social, Personality, Intelligence, Emotion, Multicultural, Gender); and Pillar 5 Mental and Physical Health (Abnormal, Health, Therapies).

Sociology

CourseDescription
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
(3 credits) An introduction to groups, organizations, and societies, and their impact on human behavior. Emphasis is on sociological perspectives, concepts, methods, and applications in areas such as organization, socialization, inequality, institutions, intergroup relations, change, etc.

Spanish

CourseDescription
SPANISH 101
Elementary Spanish
(4 credits) Develops beginning abilities in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers a basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in communicative context. Introduces students to Hispanic culture.
SPANISH 102
Elementary Spanish II
(4 credits) Continues to develop beginning abilities in all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Offers a basic study of grammatical structures and vocabulary in a communicative context. Introduces the student to Hispanic culture. PREREQ: SPANISH 101 or satisfactory placement score.
SPANISH 201
Intermediate Spanish I
(4 credits) Intended to further develop all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Intensive review of fundamentals of structure and vocabulary in a communicative context. Topics for conversation, reading, and writing focus on Hispanic cultures. Course conducted in Spanish. PREREQ: SPANISH 102 or satisfactory placement score.
SPANISH 202
Intermediate Spanish II
(4 credits) Intended to further develop all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Intensive review of fundamentals of structure and vocabulary in a communicative context. Topics for conversation, reading, and writing focus on Hispanic culture. Course conducted in Spanish. PREREQ: SPANISH 201 or satisfactory placement score.
SPANISH 203 Intermediate Spanish for the Native or Near-Native Speaker(4 credits) A course designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability, but with little or no formal training in grammar, reading and writing. Provides introduction to and practice in the formal register in all four skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Topics for conversation, reading and writing focus on U.S. Latino cultures. Students who qualify for this course may not receive credit for SPANISH 202. Course conducted in Spanish. PREREQ: SPANISH 201 or equivalent as determined by placement exam and/or PERM/INST.

Student Success

CourseDescription
ACAD 101
Academic Success Topics
(3 credits) Focuses on the development of skills, attitudes and behaviors associated with academic success in college. Selected topics may include: transition to university life for specific groups of students (such as veterans, athletes, international students, high school students, and non-traditional students); exploration of campus resources and opportunities; time management and basic study skills; and math success strategies.
ACAD 106
Library Research Skills and Beyond
(1 credit) Students will learn research skills that will help them succeed at Boise State University and beyond. We will cover practical research skills with a focus on thinking critically about information. At the end of the course, students will know how to develop a research question, locate and evaluate information in a variety of types, and understand the basics of information ethics.
ACAD 108
Career and Life Planning
(2 credits) Helps students plan and prepare for the life they want after college. Learn how to choose a career path that balances interests, abilities, and values with realities of the job market. Explore majors, identify steps required to become employable, and build job search skills necessary to achieve goals.

Theatre Arts

CourseDescription
THEA 101
Introduction to Theatre
(3 credits) Designed to create discerning and appreciative audience members through experiencing live theatre, practicing performance criticism, and studying theatre production processes, theatre history, and dramatic literature.
THEA 102
Beginning Ballet I
(1 credit) Basics of classical dance. Beginning barre work and center training to build strength and flexibility. Designed for students with no prior experience. May be repeated for a maximum of two credits. (Pass/Fail).
THEA 103
Beginning Ballet II
(1 credit) A continuation of THEA 102. May be repeated for a maximum of two credits. (Pass/Fail). PREREQ: THEA 102 or instructor's permission.
THEA 210
Repertory Dance
(2 credits) Choreography class for the creatively inclined dance student. Designed to give the student an opportunity to work with a professional choreographer to learn methods of choreography, to rehearse, and to prepare for performance. Requirements involve choreographing a dance piece during the semester and perform in the faculty choreography. At least one year of dance training is recommended. May be repeated once at each level for credit. PREREQ: PERM/INST.

Contact Us

Contact us for more information about Boise State Concurrent Enrollment.

Concurrent Enrollment Facebook Link